Cape Ann Weather - The Blizzard of '78
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Bearskin Neck - Rockport
 

Bearskin Neck - Rockport

Bearskin Neck - Rockport

Motif #1 - Bradley Wharf
 

Pigeon Cove - Rockport

Pigeon Cove Harbor

Pigeon Cove Harbor
 

Bearskin Neck ("My Place")

North Basin - Rockport Harbor

Pigeon Cove
 

Pigeon Cove Harbor

Pigeon Cove Harbor

Bass Rocks - Gloucester
 

Nahant

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Cape Ann Weather Center
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 The Blizzard of 1978, was born February 5, 1978 with the merger of a Canadian high-pressure system and a dense mass of low pressure off the Carolina coast. By February 7, the storm had tracked north and taken on the cyclonic counter-clockwise flow characteristic of nor’easters. At its peak, storm winds reached speeds of 86 miles per hour with gusts of 111mph. The lowest central pressure was 980 mb, which made the storm comparable to a strong Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale.

 Arriving at the time of a new moon, the storm produced heavy coastal flooding along the New England coast. On Cape Ann, beachfront homes were washed away due to strong winds and coastal flooding. In all, more than 1,700 homes suffered major damage or were destroyed and 39,000 people took refuge in emergency shelters. Federal disaster assistance totaled $202 million (1978 dollars).

 Snow fell at a rate of 4 inches an hour at times during the storm, which lasted for 36 hours. The unusual duration of the 1978 Nor’easter was caused by the Canadian high, which forced the storm to loop east and then back toward the north. Thunder, lightning and hail was seen in the blizzard as it blanketed the Northeast with over three feet of snow. Drifts in New England were reported to be 15 feet deep.

 With bias-ply tires and front-wheel drive non-existent, traffic came to a standstill as major corridors like I-95 shut down. During the storm several people died on Route 128 around Boston from asphyxiation: snow had blocked the tailpipes of their idling automobiles. Many were rescued by snow mobiles and by Thanksgiving of 1978, Blizzard Babies became the rage.

Photo's on left courtesy of Coastal Zone Management website. Photo below unknown.
The Blizzard of '78
128
Route 128